Category: Daily Life

SVG’s Log – Stardate 070620202126

Went to play 9-holes at Pruneridge. COVID had some impact with signing in but people were out. Got in a few practice swings. Some key learnings include:

I’ve realized I do much better when I pause for 1-2 seconds on the backswing. Almost like when a quarterback checks his pass before releasing. I need to actually turn my back by tucking my right elbow even further back after pausing. Like many an instructor probably told me already, one needs to have your back facing the target to properly wind up. It also almost forces me to bend my left knee because my center of gravity has me falling backwards (or forwards) towards the target – almost making me start to sit down just as I begin the downswing. This is useful and I need to practice it more. A couple of other things too ….

  • I’ve switched to a baseball grip. It’s way more manageable and puts my fingers where they need to be.
  • I’ve come to realize what they mean by ‘gripping the club with your fingers.’ I’m reminded of a passage in Hogan’s book where he shows his right hand holding the club with mostly his two middle fingers. I did some online research. These two fingers are least likely to tug on the club. There a whole anatomical thing to it that basically explains why were not like apes and have the ability to do fine motor skills like writing and cutting a steak but also can bludgeon an enemy with hammer-like motions when holding a club (as in the weapon kind of club). This ability allows for incredible striking impact – such as when you use a hammer on a nail. The left hand is where the hammer motion is – and the right hand is where a lighter touch is needed as in when pitching or trying to skip a flat rock across the surface of a lake. The forefinger is the culprit that moves the club all over the place. The 2 middle fingers let you treat your hand more like the fulcrum or hinge used to lever the club. I wonder if that’s why pitchers do a lot of their stuff with their two middle fingers. And quarterback often try to eliminate the role of the pinky and the forefinger in order to throw a perfect spiral – at least that’s what it seems like. And all basketball players use these fingers for the final directional flip of the hand when going for the jumper or the 3-point shot. Watching Michael Jordan in the Last Dance I observed how he often made his shots with a separation between these two fingers and the others were off to the side. But I could just be trying to force a theory into a belief system – I have a tendency to do stuff like that. I always like to feel like I’m Indiana Jones finding the hidden secret to opening a vault or something.
  • My left hand? I now use the last 3 fingers to grip the club more like a hammer. My right pinky used to cause all sorts of trouble with the pink grip because my hands never wanted to align right. Now I kinda crink it and tuck it away or lightly put it around the grip. But gripping with my 2 middle fingers has made a huge difference in club control. And treating my left hand like its swinging a hammer has also helped.
  • I’m not looking at the ball so much. Not sure where I’m going to go with this new technique but I find if I look at my club head on the way back and just kinda look anywhere along the target line behind me and then turn my head to look at the ball as I make that last back tuck with my right elbow (basically the final effort of my wind up) and then start down – I’m way less nervous and anxious and I’m forced to just swing thru and forward – and I connect much better. I was pure magic on the practice matt – just drilling the ball straight with beautiful tall parabolas.
  • Starting out on the 1st hole – totally different story. You’d a thunk I just picked up my clubs for the first time. Miserable. That there was a line of waiting players because everyone wanted to golf today didn’t help. On the 2nd hole – after triple bogeying a par 3 – I was dismayed and the group behind me asked if I wouldn’t mind being the 4th. I’m as anti as it gets as a golfer – kinda funny when you think about it … it IS a gentlemen’s game for socializing after all, right? – but I found myself saying yes. One guy was super smooth, the second was a judicious laboring golfer who was successful 75% of the time mostly because he focused so damn hard and the third guy was worse than me. I went second on the 2nd hole – a par 5 – and just nailed my driver, the new Ping driver I picked up last year. It drifted right but it sailed unbelievably far. I made bogey. I was pleased.
  • The rest of the 7 holes were good and bad but I kept trying my new look-away-look-back technique and each time I did – Shazzam! It’s unorthodox but it just makes it feel more like I’m batting versus trying to avoid hacking up a chunk of earth – which is my biggest fear. I’m just terrified of hauling a pile of grass and dirt 10 yards in front of me. It’s nerve racking. If I wait to look at the ball just before I swing, it’s kinda like trying to make contact with a pitch. You only look over the plate when you want to connect and most of your swing just kinda happens on its own. It feels more kizmit. I’m reminded of how – what’s his name….. Jordan Speith (?) looks at the hole while putting instead of right at the ball. You know? What’s his name again? I’m getting senile.
  • Also – on the 4th or 5th hole for some reason I used my Ping 7 iron instead of my Titleist. My entire set is Tiltiest – D7s or D9s or some series from back when, I don’t really know – but I had this extra Ping in the bag. For some reason it felt really good. Not sure if it was because of my changed grip or what.
  • I had also changed up all the grips on my standard clubs to Lamkins – mediums. I love them but they’re thicker. That was good when I was doing the pinky grip but now that I switched to the baseball grip it’s still fine but the Ping was a smaller grip – more narrow and I felt like I had even more control with the baseball grip. But I’m not changing grips AGAIN. At least not any time soon.
  • I was pleased today despite the embarrassing start. I was doing some things that I could remember and replicate – especially counting “and 2 & 3” before completing the back-swing and tucking my right elbow to face my back towards the target. That check thing really works. It even works better if I double clutch because it forces me to re-set my right foot and push off it as my left knee bends in concert with my right elbow (it’s uncanny how those two joints work in sync when it comes to bending and having a good swing sequence) and get my weight moving forward instead of staying on my right foot which oft-times results in me falling backwards after completing my swing. The other thing I’m thinking of trying is to start with weight on my left foot and keep leaning forward through my back swing but that’s a little complicated.
  • Captain out.

Silicon Valley Golfer Daily Diary: Fulcrums, Pendulums & Grips 052120201642

Wearing a sports coat is actually a golf training tip
for keeping shoulders and arms as one unit

I’ve been hacking at improving my game

Since last I wrote, I’ve been digging and studying a practicing. This truly as an argonaut’s journey.

Couple things:

  • Mike Austin – this guy from back in the day who made some videos with himself in a skeleton body suit to discuss the pair of ball joints and motions that are involved in the golf swing. The videos are really quite informative – check ’em out. I’ve never seen anything else explain it quite the way he does. You’ve got the connection between your skull/neck and spine which is a pivot area, your shoulders, elbows, wrists, hips, ankles, knees and so on. He concludes many videos by emphasizing that the swing is about the sequence of these joints operating in pronation, flexing and extensions and a bunch of other muscle-motion related terms but it all makes sense when you watch. THIS has made an impression on me and I’m incorporating it into my practices
  • My Grip – I’m done with the pinky grip. I’ve been using this grip since I’ve started learning on day one. I’ve now decided, “Who cares if Tiger uses it?! – it does not help my hands work as one!” I’ve played around and found that the baseball grip works much better for me. It was a little awkward at first but …. waddayagonnado? – it’s now quite comfortable. I can actually feel more of a pendulum motion at the top of my back swing and the bottom and the follow thru. I just have way more fluidity. In addition, after practicing with wiffle balls and a portable mat at the local university – SJSU – I made an adjustment to my baseball grip by putting my left thumb under the palm of my right hand instead of having it wrap around the club like a baseball bat. Both ways are better than the pinky but this small adjustment stops me from pulling inwards and coming over the top on my downswing. My fingers (especially my forefinger) don’t get in my way – meaning they don’t get excited and trigger happy making my arms and wrist tense up – who knew that the ability to pinch interferes with the ability to grip and hold. With this new method, I can really feel the club AND control it.
  • More on posture – when how-to instructions talk about putting your weight left or right they’re really referring to your CoG (center of gravity) which requires a different mental calculus than just shifting some weight to one leg or the other. I finding that the imagery of having my head/neck act as the fulcrum in a catapult that is trying to fling a canon ball (that is cradled to the golf head) along an arc to its destination target – this helps me understand how the whole head-neck-shoulder-armpit-arm apparatus is suppose to ‘work-as-on’ and why my head needs to stay till. It’s all about the swinging – not the pulling or the batting but the rocking motion of an oil rig or those sailing ship pendulum swing rides at the amusement park. More importantly, I’ve realized that because I’m of average height (5’10.5″ – 11″) but have a low center of gravity (maybe its my runner-thighs) that I establish a much better pendulum flow and arc if I assume a fairly – actually very – straight posture – like I’m barely leaning forward. Basically, just slightly bending my knees and tilting my head a bit. Maybe it’s because I have a fairly pronounced curvature in my lower back already or something but …. things are more natural and my swing’s more consistent and the sequence of interplay between joints more natural when I do that.
Is that so?

So it feels like the good weather is bringing back some good spirits and good willingness and aptitude for this year’s attempt at improving my golf game. Maybe it’s related to the fact that my daughter is back home studying college courses via distance learning – because it’s been some time since I’ve focused this much. Or maybe it’s COVID-19. Or maybe my brain finally got tired of me trying to mentally imagine how to improve my swing.

But I must say – today’s practice felt good and generated good results. Out of about 100 wiffle balls I had only 6-7 shanks or pulls or top-overs. I had a couple balls fly right. And the rest all fell in a radius of 8 feet about 25-35 yard straight ahead of me with about 70% of those within a radius of 5 feet.

It was a nice day on the open grass. A lot of students were taking graduation pictures since there was no graduation ceremony. The flowers were blooming and it was a classic dry, clean sunshine, cautiously breezy easy kind of day.

I’ll take it.

1 Week Later and It’s GO Time

Just a quick note of thanks to the words of encouragement from you fellow good golfers and hacker golfers out there.

Not long after I made my journal entry about failing to accomplish much of any of my 2016 golfing goals, the universe seemed to take pity on me and I stumbled onto a friend who belongs to a group of guys – some hackers some quite good – who play once a month as a kinda club.

He invited me out. And I actually took him up on it instead of hiding behind some excuse that was really disguising my fear of having to display my lacking abilities in public (I’m always coming up with excuses). Talk about rare. I decided to say “Yes” to the universe this time.

And guess what?…….. wait for it…………….. wait for it

I played 18 holes at the Half Moon Bay Golf Course right next to the Ritz Carlton (beautiful place) south of San Francisco on a gorgeous Saturday last last weekend.

Don’t ask me how I did. This was a binary victory. Did I play – Yes/ No. Yes – you win!

It was a good time.

I am getting some more motivation. And I actually struck my first shot – a 3 iron on a Par 4 dog-leg left perfectly. And then it went down hill – but overall, not too shabby.

Fear is such a big resistance engine. I’ve just gotta get over myself and my fear. Turns out – nobody really cares as long as we have a good time which we did.

Next step: re-evaluating my stance. I think my stance is too narrow. I was flipping thru an instruction handbook and it recommended that you drop a club from each shoulder straight down and your heels should be just outside of the line where it lands. If so, I’ve been depriving myself of stability with a way too narrow stance.

But we’ll see.

Anyway – that’s all I got.

I’m back in the game for now and hopefully for a much longer stint this time. Better yet – hopefully – forever! If I remember one of our other popular golf writer’s comments – “It all starts with making a decision and listening to your motivation and desire.”

Next stop – signing up with the NCGA and working towards establishing my official handicap number.

Question: “Can they go into 4-digits?”

Yuck yuck – I’m such a comedian.

SVgolfer_out.

 

 

Back to The Future 2017 – Part II

This is what I wrote on January 04, 2017:

starttrek

Captain’s Log (I always like to pretend I’m Captain Kirk). Journal Entry Title – “Try Try Again & Back to the Future Basics.” 

“Well it’s another New Year and I have to stare into my mental mirror and be honest with myself while trying not to extinguish any new flames for getting back onto the golfing saddle so to speak.

pastLast year I set out some serious goals that I thought would be easily attained in terms of improving my golf game. One of them was to play in a local tournament before the year was out. While on our way to San Diego for a little sun and warmth, my daughter asked me if I had accomplished this simple goal and I had to reply, “No.” I then heard all of my words of advice offered up to her freely in terms of improving at playing the Viola or mastering Calculus assignments or completing her Girls Scout project – how genius is 1 percent inspiration and 99 per cent perspiration, how putting in the time and making important things a priority in one’s daily life is essential for success at anything…. and all the other sage words I offered to get her through her fall school semester.

COME ON! – How hard is it to play and practice at least 3-4X a month and enter a tournament – ANY tournament?? It could’ve been a tournament for people who never held a golf club and I still would’ve been able to ‘check the box.’

But NO – Bupkiss – I failed. I failed to get myself where I wanted to be by December 30, 2016. I didn’t practice at the range, I didn’t play the easy 9-hole course only 10 minutes ways, I stopped watching Golf Academy, I let my Golf magazine subscription lapse and my clubs gathered dust.

And then. I thought a little harder. But you know? Now that I stop and think about it – HOLD ON! It wasn’t a complete wash. I did make some forays and I did check some boxes. I signed up for lessons and took 4 out of the allotted 5 lessons. And for about 5 weeks I did practice routines that the instructor suggested and did some of my own investigation and work on my balance, foot positioning and swing. I got a pre-paid key for the ball machine and use up half of the $100 dollar allotment. I picked up a new Titliest pitching wedge 56 degree. And I did spend a lot of time online watching Hogan’s and Palmers and Oosterhuis’ and other players’ golf swings ( to see whose body type most matched mine and what they did with it). I gave a ton of thought during meetings at work or while waiting in the security line at the airport on weight shifting and stuff like proper posture and how nothing should be hurried in the backswing. And after a lot of thinking I actually arrived at a conclusion: That I had yet to settle on some of the best basics for my swing – namely my grip and my posture.

As much as I like the pinky grip because it feels more secure, I think it wasn’t allowing me to grasp the club properly with my forefinger and thumb. SO I played around with it – starting around October. And recently decided to experiment with the overlap grip. It wasn’t entirely comfortable at first but it did make me feel like I had more control and consistency in maintaining a firmer but more supple grip all around. overlap1

And there was more!!

I also decided that I was bending over too much – and definitely from the waist instead of from the hips and, most importantly, that my lower back was not as straight as it should be. So I started practicing around the house – bending at the hips and settling into a position that had my back-end pushing out as if I was just getting ready to sit down. And I read and Googled more on it and went to the range only a few weeks ago standing taller and more erect. While there, I also flared my left foot a little more to help with some rotation and I tried to keep my chin up a little more in order to really allow room for my shoulders to rotate – something I fail to do a lot but which can really mess with my arc causing a lot of adjustments in the downswing and often making me hit turf before ball.

And, You know what? My first 2017 practice swing at the range with my new Titliest pitching wedges was delicious. And this was after months of not practicing but just mentally and randomly working on some fundamentals until they made sense.

drivingrange-2There I was after a long time off the range and I hit several shots that really felt good. After striking a bucket of ~80 balls I had maybe 8 shanks or flubs. 40 swings resulted in fairly straight solid trajectory paths with respectable arcs across my wedges, 8-iron and 5-iron. About 2 strokes were super sweet with the ball flying like it wanted grow feathers and keep going and with barely any sensation on the club head. The rest were pulls or pushes but they stay relatively on course and, considering how long I’d been off the range, I could not be disappointed. Frankly I was pleased.

I had reached a decision for 2017 by concluding several things:  now

  • Sometimes you’re doing work even when it seems like you’re doing nothing
  • Basics are the 80/20 rule of work. To go beyond is not advised until you have them down and sometimes it worth taking one step back in order to get those fundamentals down.
  • Don’t be so hard on yourself – the past is the past and having a short memory actually can be a good thing in most cases. Because in order for the future to be bright there’s no harm in letting go and getting started again today.
  • And sometimes even when you can’t check the box on a big goal you may still be able to point to a few steps in the right direction.

I further thought that this type of thinking is exactly the kind of advice anyone can use when pursuing just about anything including trying to kickstart a start-up company, design a self-driving car or write that great American novel. If at first you don’t succeed – try, try again. Failure and false-starts go hand in hand with perfect passes, winning touchdowns and eventual Super Bowl victories.

And with that – I re-committed.  touchdown

I’m Back to the Future and I’m headed back to the golf course! 

Svgolfer – signing out.

Back to The Future 2017 – Part I

Back to the Future and Why a Short Memory Is a Good Thing for Golfers & Start-Up Innovators

Many times I hear a sports commentator reflect on the mental game of a good quarterback, basketball player or golfer and they’ll say something like, “He has a short memory and that’s something that serves him well.” They’ll continue and say something like “You know he’s gonna fire that touchdown in there if he’s given a chance. He’s always thinking about the next down, the next play…. and doesn’t let bad passes, turnovers or interceptions throw him – You just can’t teach that stuff!!” football-pass

Confidence and the ability to ‘get ‘er done,’ comes from constantly looking forward and letting the history a mistake or a bad decision or a lapse in performance be exactly that – history. 20/20 hindsight often offers little except stoked fires of regret, resentment and self-degradation.

I think this viewpoint also applies to my journey of  trying to get to a point of comfort playing golf. A journey that’s always exacerbated by the time commitments of working overtime in the grueling new technology economy that’s fast-paced and where often the phrase ‘everything is new and has never been done before,’ stands as the crucible of what it means to be a worker in Silicon Valley. And that applies to start-up founders as well as your run of the mill everyday employee. I’ve had the luxury of being both.

EW20th_infographic_FINALThis experiment called Silicon Valley is quite amazing if you stop and think about it. Even though there are many huge billion dollar companies in the Bay Area – many of them are no more than twenty years old and that includes household names like Google, Apply and Amazon. Old-timers like Intel and Oracle are only twice as old thereabouts. Nothing here resembles the lifestyle, workstyle or pace of change found in more traditional last- century economies.  And even behemoths like Intel are still relative newborns compared to most old-economy companies. The parlance around here often refers to ‘lava formation’ as the state-of-creation that makes up everyday life and the challenges inherit in learning how to build stuff that’s never been created before – to do something new, to learn new techniques, to improve on what’s been built and to look for that proverbial touchdown after making a series of mistakes – and failure and mistakes run a plenty in this former land of “Heavenly Delight.’ We just don’t ever hear about them.

Which brings me back to my golf game. And a recent bout of retrospection I ended up grappling with over the holidays. I’ve spent some time musing over all the things I had planned to do in 2016. This was triggered by an innocent question from my daughter while on vacation. “Dad?” She asked “did you play that tournament last year like you said you would Dad?” She added “You know, you’ll never get better if you don’t practice.”

I was going to do so many things last year. I was going to be so discplined and get to the golf course and practice aspects of my swing and stance and grip while at home. I was going to get home training equipment. I was going to practice with a net in the front yard. I would get an instructor. I would play at least once a month and my crowning achievement would be playing in a tournament – any tournament! I hardly accomplished anyone of these goals – in fact, I hardly accomplished anything the more I looked backwards. My mental judger started issuing proclamations. What a loser I am. I’m never going to get anywhere. I’ve wasted so much time. Why should I bother? Making resolutions is a pointless thing to do.

Thinking about making commitments for this year became harder and harder. And then something changed. I decided to focus on the present and realized how what I decided to focus on NOW could make all the difference in how I would feel one year from now and beyond. There’s nothing I can do about yesterday but I still can impact tomorrow by doing something now. One day maybe I will be a 65 year old Unicorn tearing it up in some senior tournament – who knows? But I won’t get anywhere worrying and feeling down about the past. My biggest challenge wasn’t to figure out where I went wrong but to make a decision to re-commit today. And I thought about the sports commentators. The difference between success and failure starts in the mind. Deciding to try again isn’t really that hard a decision to make. And after much trepidation, I did.

….continued in Part II

Safeway Open -Just my luck

Figures – this is the first year in a while that I didn’t volunteer for the Fry’s.com Open now sponsored by and called the Safeway Open. And this is the year Tiger comes back. How cool would it have been to track balls off the tee while standing in the fairway and sending the GPS coordinates back to the broadcast booth – probably one of my favorite jobs as a volunteer- it can get crazy sometimes when the register doesn’t have the players’ clothing colors correct or caddie bibs are miss matched etc. so it’s hard to tell who is who using binoculars and getting your measurements in on time before they take their second shot….Still it’s a blast and you get to work in pairs and share your love of golf stories with another amateur.

But that was literally the last time I spent anytime focusing on golf – almost one full year ago – and since then I’ve been heads down at a new Silicon Valley gig marketing yet another Cloud technology-as-a-Service. I can’t complain – even in this very warm Valley economy having a gig is a blessing. Clearly I’ve had little time to do anything else let alone fulfill many of my golfing new year’s goals. But actually I did fulfill going back and signing up for lessons with an instructor and getting in a few practice rounds. And I got a new Titliest pitching wedge 56 degree Vokey. But I never played an amateur tournament. I’ll need to carry that over to next year although I still have 2 months left. Still I’m happy to see the tournament underway. And I’m getting ready to get serious again about my golf game. I can’t look backwards. I need to figure out a way to work hard and still improve my golf game. I think I need to embrace the term “baby steps.”

 

PGA Golf Lessons Apply to the Silicon Valley Start Up LIfe

Out here in the Valley all the news is always abuzz about a new start-up that’s become the next “Unicorn” – that rare little 4-person operation that started in a garage with just a twinkle of an idea and little faith and lots of chutzpah and a desire to change the world – and then Boom! “It’s a Unicorn!!” an unbelievable entity of the likes of Google or Instagram or Facebook Uber or whatever.  One day you’re like “Who?” and the next day everyone is using that smartphone gadget or uploading photos using that must-have app.

Myth of the Unicorn

Myth of the Unicorn

I think many of the qualities that are required to make it as a start-up founder (or start-up marketer for that matter – my bailiwick) are quite similar to the one’s that make for a pro golf contender.  Very few that apply to one don’t apply to the other.  Here are some of the mental game qualities I heard Sir Nick mention in the commentary before the start of the final round this past Sunday.  Life is golf – golf is life, is how I see it.

Courage – Whistling Straits demanded it of all players.   There was no room for error.  the Penalty for missing the fairway or the green were scary and sometimes insurmountable.  Courage and conviction with one’s shot selection and swing were key.

An Uncluttered Mind (Focus) – is how Jack Nicklaus described Jordan Speith, according to Sir Nick, and his ability to play consistently and to bounce back from a setback.  Setbacks are common when building a startup.  Set-forwards, if you will, are called “pivot-points” around here.  It means staying positive while learning from one’s mistake and making adjustments and coming back even stronger.  Jordan’s greatest quality perhaps is his ability to stay clear of mind and light spirited and to keep his mind uncluttered.

Courage

Courage

Visualize – you’ve heard it all too many times but you need to see your future in order to make it happen just right.  Same thing with the golf balls trajectory.  See it and believe it and chances are it will become.

No fear – I guess that’s the brother to courage.  It’s also a sticker found on many a car. And I guess that’s what Grateful Golfer’s friend had the other day when playing that impossible shot from deep in the woods.

Right Intention – I thought Nick made a particularly rare point here.  See the shot and adapt to the shot with the right intention.  I think that means letting go of the negative and holding on to the real goal – which is to be your best self regardless of the circumstance.  To not play from a place of anger or negativity.  There’s a little bit of letting go that is a part of this – I think.

On a mission – with all that said – you still have to have that Rocky Balboa attitude that you’re going after a goal and you’re going to make it.  Can you hear the brass horns playing as Sylvester runs up the stairs?  Often in the Valley we call it the “Stormin’ Normandy” mentality recollecting the beachhead strategy by the allies that required sheer will and determination despite the obvious downside to the strategy.  Another way to say it is “By any means necessary.”  This is about grit.  This is about believing with your head, heart and soul and beyond.  Nothing’s gonna stop you.  Jordan seems to have this.  Tiger had it (and I would argue, despite his lackluster results of late – is still really showing it, even more so because no one believes in him anymore and yet he’s still out there giving it the best he’s got).

And then ( 2 commercials later)….. I was struck by an equaling compelling thought pattern that applies to golf, life, and start-ups.  When asked how he did what he did in his 3rd round performance, Matt Jones replied he “pretended like it was a practice round, tried to relax and decided to just have fun with it.

As serious as all this stuff seems to be – in the end, as long as we remain gentlemen and hold onto our integrity and play fair….. all of it, life, golf, startups, the daily grind, – all of it is intended to be fun – it’s really just a game.  It just becomes really hard when we forget that.

courage2

SVG-out

Practice Notes to Self on the Backswing – Think Frisbee

wrist, arms, shoulders, and hips turning in sequence with a frisbee

wrist, arms, shoulders, and hips turning in sequence with a frisbee

Did some front yard practicing today with my at-home practice station. Took out my SKLZ target netting, a fairly huge contraption but easy to set up (don’t worry I don’t use real golf balls – i use the perforated plastic ones instead), and tried out my new grips and tried to focus on some backswing drills that work on the CASH principle of trying to move/turn the clubhead (in other words – the wrists) first, then the arms then the shoulders and then the hips.

I did a few swings slow motion but it was hard to think it through on a normal swing and I started to get all jumbled.

Then I remembered a thought I had after reading something online – about the swing really being all about the left arm.  If you use the left arm to move the club instead of your right arm – you’ll have a better chance of guiding the club correctly.

That’s the thing with golf – it’s such a game of opposites – swing down to get the ball up, focus on calming your mind instead of getting all pumped up, work on being more humble instead of brandishing your ego.  When it comes to the swing – I’m figuring out it’s about using your non-dominate arm instead of getting power and control from your right arm (if you’re right handed).

frisbee3So I had a little Eureka moment.  When i tried to focus on that – I came up with the thought of trying to throw a frisbee with my left hand.  I was playing with the idea that the backswing and the swing all together is more like a left-handed backhand in tennis.  I read that in one of the blogs or a magazine.  And I always heard that the swing altogether is like trying to skip a stone across a pond or similar to a pitcher throwing a baseball.  But the latter images made me focus on my right hand and action with my right wrist arm and shoulders. But when I tried to emulate throwing a frisbee with my left hand I sorta kinda really got the sensation of having to keep that left arm extended, turning my wrists at the right times and leading with my hips as I tried to shift from back to front. It was palatable and replicable and natural even if awkward.

I also got the feeling that I could also emulate the sensation of trying to hit a nail with a hammer – something you hear many pros talk about when talking about the precise nature of getting the sequence for power right…the idea that you delay the striking of the hammer until just before you hit the nail much like you need to delay the club head from swinging forward until it comes back down below your hips. The whipping sensation came about naturally when I tried to swing like I was throwing a frisbee – because the speed of the frisbee comes from delaying the flicking of the wrist until the last moment.

Anywho – the ‘throwing of the frisbee with my left hand’ seems to work conceptually for me much more so then trying to think clubhead, arms, shoulders, hips.

So my practice session was useful in that regard.  Now I’ll have to see if that sensation remains after a few more practices.  But after several weeks of feeling like I haven’t started making improvements on anything except putting, this is a glimmer of hope.

That’s golf for ya’.  Just when you start to get discouraged, she throws you a bone and you’re right back in it like its the first day. Hazzah!!

frisbee motions similar to golf swing

frisbee motions similar to golf swing

Backswing Basics – CASH into a good sequence

So I’m back into focusing on my game.  I played 9 holes a couple weeks back and although it wasn’t a great round I did notice that the one area I did well in was my putting – which is the one area I’ve been focusing on since the beginning of the year.  I can’t beat myself up too much because work’s been a grind and I haven’t been able to focus or practice much but I need to double down and re-look at my goals for this year.  But it felt great having such a grooved routine that I didn’t have to even think about for my putting.  I never 3-putted and I guess that counts for something.

I’m almost done with my batch of lessons – my very first batch of lessons from an instructor EVER! – and I have to admit that the greatest benefit from this is that I swing all the way around in one full motion now – instead of decelerating or stopping short.  My instructor’s been good with giving me mental thoughts and I’ve changed out my grips (per his advice) for the first time ever.  Who knew? (common phrase for me it seems) but grips are like running shoes – you have to replace them every so often even if you don’t play with them – they dry out from use and/or age.  At a minimum you should wash them often to get the grit off.

So now I have a new set of Golf Prides’ that are a smidge wider than my older grips on my new/used set of Titliest DC9’s.

And now I have a confidence that if I focus on a particular area of my game, I will see improvement over time – so I’m gonna focus on my irons. 3-9.

Recently I read a GratefulG blog about the many resources available to us die-hards and I decided to take advantage of online videos and such to research how to practice my backswing where I have a lot of trouble sequencing club movement and staying on plane.  It didn’t take long for me to realize that the real sequence evolves from thinking purely about the left arm’s movement and to think: clubhead, then arms, then shoulders, then hips when it comes to what rotates in what order. The acronym is CASH.  Move the clubhead to 730pm on the clock face, then move the arms to 9 oclock, then turn the shoulders until the left shoulder is under your chin/chest over your right foot, and lastly turn your hips until your back faces the target.  Also, I’m learning that the backswing is not where you get power – it’s just the set-up to get into position – like pulling the bow back before you release the arrow.  Once I got the CASH thing in my head, I saw it every where – on TV, in magazines and in a ton of online videos so this is a fundamental that I need to groove into a routine.

Anyway, that’s where I am for now.  I haven’t written in a while but I’m gonna try and get back in the saddle for that as well.

My Pittsburgh Steelers are playing tonight – whoo hoo! life is good.  I love my new grips – they feel great.  I shoulda done that a long time ago.

SVG-out

Backswing_CASH