Category: Thinking

SVG’s Log – Stardate 070620202126

Went to play 9-holes at Pruneridge. COVID had some impact with signing in but people were out. Got in a few practice swings. Some key learnings include:

I’ve realized I do much better when I pause for 1-2 seconds on the backswing. Almost like when a quarterback checks his pass before releasing. I need to actually turn my back by tucking my right elbow even further back after pausing. Like many an instructor probably told me already, one needs to have your back facing the target to properly wind up. It also almost forces me to bend my left knee because my center of gravity has me falling backwards (or forwards) towards the target – almost making me start to sit down just as I begin the downswing. This is useful and I need to practice it more. A couple of other things too ….

  • I’ve switched to a baseball grip. It’s way more manageable and puts my fingers where they need to be.
  • I’ve come to realize what they mean by ‘gripping the club with your fingers.’ I’m reminded of a passage in Hogan’s book where he shows his right hand holding the club with mostly his two middle fingers. I did some online research. These two fingers are least likely to tug on the club. There a whole anatomical thing to it that basically explains why were not like apes and have the ability to do fine motor skills like writing and cutting a steak but also can bludgeon an enemy with hammer-like motions when holding a club (as in the weapon kind of club). This ability allows for incredible striking impact – such as when you use a hammer on a nail. The left hand is where the hammer motion is – and the right hand is where a lighter touch is needed as in when pitching or trying to skip a flat rock across the surface of a lake. The forefinger is the culprit that moves the club all over the place. The 2 middle fingers let you treat your hand more like the fulcrum or hinge used to lever the club. I wonder if that’s why pitchers do a lot of their stuff with their two middle fingers. And quarterback often try to eliminate the role of the pinky and the forefinger in order to throw a perfect spiral – at least that’s what it seems like. And all basketball players use these fingers for the final directional flip of the hand when going for the jumper or the 3-point shot. Watching Michael Jordan in the Last Dance I observed how he often made his shots with a separation between these two fingers and the others were off to the side. But I could just be trying to force a theory into a belief system – I have a tendency to do stuff like that. I always like to feel like I’m Indiana Jones finding the hidden secret to opening a vault or something.
  • My left hand? I now use the last 3 fingers to grip the club more like a hammer. My right pinky used to cause all sorts of trouble with the pink grip because my hands never wanted to align right. Now I kinda crink it and tuck it away or lightly put it around the grip. But gripping with my 2 middle fingers has made a huge difference in club control. And treating my left hand like its swinging a hammer has also helped.
  • I’m not looking at the ball so much. Not sure where I’m going to go with this new technique but I find if I look at my club head on the way back and just kinda look anywhere along the target line behind me and then turn my head to look at the ball as I make that last back tuck with my right elbow (basically the final effort of my wind up) and then start down – I’m way less nervous and anxious and I’m forced to just swing thru and forward – and I connect much better. I was pure magic on the practice matt – just drilling the ball straight with beautiful tall parabolas.
  • Starting out on the 1st hole – totally different story. You’d a thunk I just picked up my clubs for the first time. Miserable. That there was a line of waiting players because everyone wanted to golf today didn’t help. On the 2nd hole – after triple bogeying a par 3 – I was dismayed and the group behind me asked if I wouldn’t mind being the 4th. I’m as anti as it gets as a golfer – kinda funny when you think about it … it IS a gentlemen’s game for socializing after all, right? – but I found myself saying yes. One guy was super smooth, the second was a judicious laboring golfer who was successful 75% of the time mostly because he focused so damn hard and the third guy was worse than me. I went second on the 2nd hole – a par 5 – and just nailed my driver, the new Ping driver I picked up last year. It drifted right but it sailed unbelievably far. I made bogey. I was pleased.
  • The rest of the 7 holes were good and bad but I kept trying my new look-away-look-back technique and each time I did – Shazzam! It’s unorthodox but it just makes it feel more like I’m batting versus trying to avoid hacking up a chunk of earth – which is my biggest fear. I’m just terrified of hauling a pile of grass and dirt 10 yards in front of me. It’s nerve racking. If I wait to look at the ball just before I swing, it’s kinda like trying to make contact with a pitch. You only look over the plate when you want to connect and most of your swing just kinda happens on its own. It feels more kizmit. I’m reminded of how – what’s his name….. Jordan Speith (?) looks at the hole while putting instead of right at the ball. You know? What’s his name again? I’m getting senile.
  • Also – on the 4th or 5th hole for some reason I used my Ping 7 iron instead of my Titleist. My entire set is Tiltiest – D7s or D9s or some series from back when, I don’t really know – but I had this extra Ping in the bag. For some reason it felt really good. Not sure if it was because of my changed grip or what.
  • I had also changed up all the grips on my standard clubs to Lamkins – mediums. I love them but they’re thicker. That was good when I was doing the pinky grip but now that I switched to the baseball grip it’s still fine but the Ping was a smaller grip – more narrow and I felt like I had even more control with the baseball grip. But I’m not changing grips AGAIN. At least not any time soon.
  • I was pleased today despite the embarrassing start. I was doing some things that I could remember and replicate – especially counting “and 2 & 3” before completing the back-swing and tucking my right elbow to face my back towards the target. That check thing really works. It even works better if I double clutch because it forces me to re-set my right foot and push off it as my left knee bends in concert with my right elbow (it’s uncanny how those two joints work in sync when it comes to bending and having a good swing sequence) and get my weight moving forward instead of staying on my right foot which oft-times results in me falling backwards after completing my swing. The other thing I’m thinking of trying is to start with weight on my left foot and keep leaning forward through my back swing but that’s a little complicated.
  • Captain out.

My Golf Swing AHA Moment at-the-Car-Wash

How to learn the illusive secrets to the ideal Golf Swing while cleaning your car?

February 26, 2020: San Jose, CA.

Abstract: Grab a car floor mat, preferably a front seat mat. Hold it as you typically would at one of its corners, prepare to thwack the dirt off of it by find a vertical surface like a wall or one of those yellow hip-height gas station pilon/pole things that protect gasoline pumps from fender benders or, better yet, something that looks like a telephone pole …… the type of pole you might find, say, at a car wash next to the big vacuum machines ….. – and then start thwacking it like you’ve done all your life – and voila!! You too may realize my AHA moment! From this silicon valley golfer’s perspective you’re (I’m) performing every aspect of winding up (with no chicken wing), pausing at the top, transferring your weight with your hips and legs, and swinging thru with perfect timing to have the club head – i mean, the surface of the mat – smack the pole perpendicular for maximum dust jettisoning effect … and you’ve assimilated all those tips and tricks every golf instructor or YouTube video has been trying to explain to you but for some reason you could never translate to your real-time golf game. Phew – long run on sentence there – my bad.

Even your fingers will be grasping the mat in a manner that amazingly matches the ideal golf club grip (you know, like those holding-a-gun analogies or a baseball in preparation to pitch analogies or a skipping stone at lakeside analogy or pick any number of mental images) that requires the cocking of the forefinger and V-shaped pressing of your thumb’s plumpy base against the base of said forefinger and where middle, 3rd and pinky fingers curl and tuck in nicely behind the aforementioned duo. (Sidenote: The only other previous best analogy for me to conjure up a mental image up until now was holding a carving knife with a nice big chef’s handle … the thumb, fore finger and other fingers seemingly fall right into place without me having to see if my second knuckle is visible and all that other mechanical garble-dee-goop). It is the perfect analog, to my mind, for what you’re trying to accomplish with a golf club from a balanced position which, by the way, you also natural assume as you prepare for maximum dust-thwacking propulsion effect. So that’s the shorthand abstract of my AHA golf swing story. But wait – I know you. You enjoy my clever anecdotes, ramblings and digression – yes? no? No matter, the long form in all its glory follows. That’s how this golf Argonaut rolls. Happy visioning!

My wind up for golfing AND playing whack-a-mole…

FULL NARRATIVE: I’m one of those people who needs to visually and mentally understand a concept before I can execute anything that is difficult to do especially when it comes to sports. This is especially true for my attempts at understanding what the golf swing is suppose to feel like.

For years I’ve struggled – even though I’ve improved – to develop a sense of fluidity with my golf swing like I have, say, for shooting a basketball three-pointer or pitching a baseball. I might not be a professional but I completely and conceptually understand the form, flow and function of every part of my body for these motions. And, more importantly, I can actually perform the proper sequence in good form too I might add. However, try as I might, this has escaped me in terms of the golf swing until now or rather until a few weeks ago when I was cleaning my car at the do-it-yourself car wash or more specifically while I was whacking the dust out of the car’s floor mats – that’s right, I found the answer I’ve been looking for low these past 5+ years while pounding out dust from a car’s floor mats – go figure. This! … after having contemplated any number of metaphors and similes and analogies and suggestions as to what the golf swing motion resembles ….. some of which are listed below.

Any number of visualizations have been offered via live instruction, books, magazines and TV shows. “The swing is similar to throwing a freebie, or like the set-up and bowling a bowling ball or cracking a whip or driving a top-spin cross-court backhand in tennis.” And the stance is all about setting up in a balanced way much like a weight lifter prepares to lift bar bells (back posture, posterior pushed back, arms hanging loosely in front, etc.). The motion is not dissimilar to the process of throwing a javelin or a discus or even sweeping the floor with a broom.

My back is killing me – how am I supposed to posture again?

Over the years, I’ve spent considerable time trying to understand the fundamentals of the grip and the angle of my back and how to bend at the hips and not at the waist and all other such basics the lack of which everyone agrees conspire to complicate one’s golf swing. For the grip, I’ve finally agreed with Curtis Strange who I believe emphasized that you hold the club with your fingers which I’ve finally taken to mean that the middle fingers of my right hand have the most grip and my fore finger and thumb play a lesser role in terms of forcefulness. In time, I eventually came to the concept that my right hand should mimic holding a steak knife (if you cut a steak in the french way that requires switching the knife from the left to the right hand as you cut and then back to the left for eating) – or, for example, if you’re slicing a tomato or an onion with a butcher’s knife. Paying attention to how I hold the knife in these circumstances is very instructive – the middle fingers have the most command, the forefinger behaves like a cradling hook that guides and navigates action and the handle sits in the crux created where the base of the thumb meets the base of the forefinger of the hand exactly as golf instructors describe the “V” that should occur as the thumb presses up against the hand. Another example might be how a well trained drummer holds drum sticks or how one might hold a flat rock before preparing to skip it across the surface of a lake. You don’t drum a drum by holding drum sticks in the palm of your hand – how could you ever play Grateful Dead drum solos or master cool jazz music and cascading cymbals with that kind of a hold ….no, it’s all in the fingers, that’s where you get the power along with the flexibility and ease of movement.

I continued to visualize other analogies for set-up and balance that included the way a tennis player prepares to launch himself towards the ball as it reaches its apex in the toss or how all athletes – football players when they set before the hiking of the ball or basketball players on defense or a tennis player preparing to receive a serve – they all establish a posture that maximizes the power of their core by having firm straight backs and balancing their weight with a wide stance so they can spring into action in any direction. Nobody bends at the waist. Each of these examples requires angles that incorporate firm control of the core and the hips. I also recall how some instructors talk about standing ‘at attention’ like a soldier – tall and straight, chest kinda out, stomach kinda in, head and eyes looking forward – and only then bending the knees and bending at the hips to reach a balanced but strong position to take action.

I’m glad I don’t have to play wearing a suit – yeeeesh!

All this is well and good and has been informative. But then, after months of randomly visiting the topic as time permitted, I found myself at the car wash – the ones where you can hand wash your car in a bay and where there are several power tube vacuums and other accouterments for detailing your car. I had pulled out the floor mats and, as everyone does, I began whacking them against a metal pole to knock out the ground in dust – and the AHA! appeared literally out of thin air.

In order to have the mat strike the pole squarely face on I noticed that my body was doing all the things in the right fluid order that seemed right for a golf swing – especially how I gripped the mat with my fingers but most importantly how my wrists behaved. Everyone talks about how your wrists are supposed to roll over as you strike the ball – from the inside of the wrist looking like its facing the sky at the top of the back swing to it turning over and facing perpendicular to the ground as you follow through – in a sense this wrist motion mimics the power that is derived from similar action when pitching or swinging a baseball bat or throwing a football (perhaps not skyward vs. ground-ward but the wrist does follow a circular trajectory to end 180 degrees opposite from where it started) and demonstrates why it’s so hard for novices to have the power to throw anything well because they only use their arms and elbows but fail to get the right wrist action going.

But as I struck the mat against the pole – it was all so natural. I drifted the mat backwards, turned it as if towards the sky – in a nice slow leisurely fashion and then my body legs shoulders elbows and core all cooperated to gently shift and fluidly re-direct it towards the pole until at the last moment – THWACK – I hit the mat straight on, perpendicular to the ground with the face of the mat perfectly up/down. Had I continued the swing as if the pole didn’t exist, my wrist would have continued to roll until the mat faced the ground. It clearly faced skyward at the top of my ‘back swing.’

So now – finally – I have a concept and a visual that I understand wholly and believe in. Instead of all that other stuff like whipping the golf club by holding it upside down or pretending to use a horse whip or whatever – if I visualize trying to strike a floor mat downward at a golf ball – I have a sense of surety and comfort and faith that I am using the right fluid motion. It inherently makes sense to me.

I think that’s what the SKLZ golf hitting practice bag is also trying to impart but this analogy just strikes home for me in a more fundamental and natural way. It’s been 2 1/2 years since my daughter started college and my efforts at improving my golf game remain as erratic as they’ve ever been despite my belief that I’d have more time during this new chapter in my life and despite the fact that I can play all year round. And although I’ve developed a method of quickly converting her room into a practice chipping green while she’s away – the truth is I’ve spent the past couple years steadfastly stuck and focused understanding how to implement the fundamentals as they must apply to my body.

I now have an understanding of how to hold and swing the club. And I’ve done some others things along the way to reaching this epiphany. I’ve changed my grips to a size larger because I figured out I have long fingers compared to the size of my palms (math and ratios play such a large yet quiet role in so much of the fundamentals) and the standard grips didn’t allow me to use my fingers as optimally as I should. I’ve learned that I’ve been bent over way too much and that I have a fairly low center of gravity which means I can and should stand much more erect – kinda maybe like Fred Couples does maybe?. This is also due to the fact that my spine really curves frontwards a lot at the base near my hips so my arms still get sufficient clearance despite my erect stature. Even though the fundamentals are the same and ring true for all players and all sports, they can be and often are implemented in very custom fashion to suit the body and preference of the player. For example, I’m reminded of how the basics of a tennis serve are the same for all players and yet John McEnroe’s set-up was radically different from most players while Bjorn Borg had a classic set-up and yet they both were great servers.

I’m so smart .. I got this… .I’m just the shizbot, yes? Please please please say yes?
My ego and self-assurance – it’s so fragile ya’ know?

So now I have a concept of how I’m suppose to handle the club, the club head and my wrists – which in turn informs my elbows, arms and horizontal motions backwards and forwards.

I just have to ‘Feel the Force’ of the floor mat thwacking the metal pole at the car wash and I’m on my way to entering a new chapter in my journey learning to play golf. And yes – that last sentence was a nod to the latest Star Wars movie in the wings. This last chapter marks the beginning of a new one for me.

Random Observation on the Golf Swing & Weight Balancing

InStanceHipDown_igor-ovsyannykov-270958When instructors talk about shifting your weight during the swing, they’re really referring to shifting your pressure – as in the pressure points where you feet connect to the ground. This is why so often you might hear about the swing really starting from the lower body and the feet. Go ahead and Google videos on “foot pressure and the golf swing” and you’ll see what I mean.

When I hear ‘shift your weight’ invariably I try and move my body mass and center of gravity (which usually involves my head) laterally to the left or right – which isn’t comfortable and often makes the small of my back hurt. However, when I try to shift pressure points it’s all about where my weight presses against the ground in term of the ball of my feet and the heels and which foot.

So when I need to shift right, my body stays in the exact same place mostly but my left ankle relaxes and flexes up from the heel so that most of my pressure glides over to my right foot and rests between the big-toe ball and my inner heel. The more my swing goes back, the more the pressure transitions to the back of my right heel and my left foot goes into a mini high-heel position which may or may not also result in my left knee rising – much like a batter winding up to strike the ball. Shifting pressure points back left again is more footwork with a push off the right foot and a slight bend back to the front, while my left heel returns firmly down to the ground bracing itself for me to begin rotating around my left leg as an axis. All this coincides with a similar change in vertical-ness as far as my shoulder sockets go – because we all should be starting off with the right shoulder slightly lower than the left but during the backswing the right shoulder will switch height location with the left in a way that matches what’s going on ‘down-ground.’

But the huge AHA takeaway for me is – it is NOT about moving my shoulders and torso laterally from left to right or really about me feeling a lot of strain in my thighs but rather about this groove and shift between my left and right feet. That’s why the head needs to generally stay in place – even though many great pros like Jack Nicklaus actually move their head behind the ball when swinging through.

Observation #2. Golf is a lot of math and geometry. Golf is so much about circles and straight lines. Every round part of our bodies – from the balls of our feet and our ankle, to our knee sockets and hip sockets, to our arms and elbow and shoulder sockets – needs to rotate and un-rotate in sync to get that straight bone that’s connected to the socket in question to swing groovy and smoothly.

But when I think about the pressure thingy – the analog of the swing being more like bowling & throwing rings true for me. The way I rock before winding up to bowl a bowling ball and how I try to roll the ball onto the wooden floor works better than the image of trying to hit a baseball even if there are many similarities in the wind up and delivery.

Golf swings are also very unique for each individual depending on the measurements between all these round body parts as explained in the article which really shed more light on what my swing should be like. I started measuring myself – my wingspan, my forearm, etc., and I’m beginning to think that mine’s more of a swing that settles below the plain of my shoulders at the apex of the back swing versus above the shoulder line. And who knew? Many pros reach high points in their back swings that are either above, at, or below their shoulder planes as also described in this piece. It was very enlightening. And it makes sense – after all – every one has a different combinations on pant & inseam, neck and shirt sleeve and waist dimensions along with height dimensions. So what works for a tall golfer doesn’t necessarily translate for a stocky or long-armed or short-legged or whatever-dimension-ed golfer.

Now I won’t try to force myself to rotate so much and have my left wrist reach above my ears during the back swing – which is very uncomfortable. Instead I’m going to swing back in a way that more mimics a side-arm pitcher. I feel much more comfortable that way.

Glad to be back after many months away and hoping to get back into a rhythm. Happy Friday.

Royalty Free Photo by Igor Ovsyannykov on Unsplash

Check it out. THE SWING PLANE EXPLAINED.

Back to The Future 2017 – Part II

This is what I wrote on January 04, 2017:

starttrek

Captain’s Log (I always like to pretend I’m Captain Kirk). Journal Entry Title – “Try Try Again & Back to the Future Basics.” 

“Well it’s another New Year and I have to stare into my mental mirror and be honest with myself while trying not to extinguish any new flames for getting back onto the golfing saddle so to speak.

pastLast year I set out some serious goals that I thought would be easily attained in terms of improving my golf game. One of them was to play in a local tournament before the year was out. While on our way to San Diego for a little sun and warmth, my daughter asked me if I had accomplished this simple goal and I had to reply, “No.” I then heard all of my words of advice offered up to her freely in terms of improving at playing the Viola or mastering Calculus assignments or completing her Girls Scout project – how genius is 1 percent inspiration and 99 per cent perspiration, how putting in the time and making important things a priority in one’s daily life is essential for success at anything…. and all the other sage words I offered to get her through her fall school semester.

COME ON! – How hard is it to play and practice at least 3-4X a month and enter a tournament – ANY tournament?? It could’ve been a tournament for people who never held a golf club and I still would’ve been able to ‘check the box.’

But NO – Bupkiss – I failed. I failed to get myself where I wanted to be by December 30, 2016. I didn’t practice at the range, I didn’t play the easy 9-hole course only 10 minutes ways, I stopped watching Golf Academy, I let my Golf magazine subscription lapse and my clubs gathered dust.

And then. I thought a little harder. But you know? Now that I stop and think about it – HOLD ON! It wasn’t a complete wash. I did make some forays and I did check some boxes. I signed up for lessons and took 4 out of the allotted 5 lessons. And for about 5 weeks I did practice routines that the instructor suggested and did some of my own investigation and work on my balance, foot positioning and swing. I got a pre-paid key for the ball machine and use up half of the $100 dollar allotment. I picked up a new Titliest pitching wedge 56 degree. And I did spend a lot of time online watching Hogan’s and Palmers and Oosterhuis’ and other players’ golf swings ( to see whose body type most matched mine and what they did with it). I gave a ton of thought during meetings at work or while waiting in the security line at the airport on weight shifting and stuff like proper posture and how nothing should be hurried in the backswing. And after a lot of thinking I actually arrived at a conclusion: That I had yet to settle on some of the best basics for my swing – namely my grip and my posture.

As much as I like the pinky grip because it feels more secure, I think it wasn’t allowing me to grasp the club properly with my forefinger and thumb. SO I played around with it – starting around October. And recently decided to experiment with the overlap grip. It wasn’t entirely comfortable at first but it did make me feel like I had more control and consistency in maintaining a firmer but more supple grip all around. overlap1

And there was more!!

I also decided that I was bending over too much – and definitely from the waist instead of from the hips and, most importantly, that my lower back was not as straight as it should be. So I started practicing around the house – bending at the hips and settling into a position that had my back-end pushing out as if I was just getting ready to sit down. And I read and Googled more on it and went to the range only a few weeks ago standing taller and more erect. While there, I also flared my left foot a little more to help with some rotation and I tried to keep my chin up a little more in order to really allow room for my shoulders to rotate – something I fail to do a lot but which can really mess with my arc causing a lot of adjustments in the downswing and often making me hit turf before ball.

And, You know what? My first 2017 practice swing at the range with my new Titliest pitching wedges was delicious. And this was after months of not practicing but just mentally and randomly working on some fundamentals until they made sense.

drivingrange-2There I was after a long time off the range and I hit several shots that really felt good. After striking a bucket of ~80 balls I had maybe 8 shanks or flubs. 40 swings resulted in fairly straight solid trajectory paths with respectable arcs across my wedges, 8-iron and 5-iron. About 2 strokes were super sweet with the ball flying like it wanted grow feathers and keep going and with barely any sensation on the club head. The rest were pulls or pushes but they stay relatively on course and, considering how long I’d been off the range, I could not be disappointed. Frankly I was pleased.

I had reached a decision for 2017 by concluding several things:  now

  • Sometimes you’re doing work even when it seems like you’re doing nothing
  • Basics are the 80/20 rule of work. To go beyond is not advised until you have them down and sometimes it worth taking one step back in order to get those fundamentals down.
  • Don’t be so hard on yourself – the past is the past and having a short memory actually can be a good thing in most cases. Because in order for the future to be bright there’s no harm in letting go and getting started again today.
  • And sometimes even when you can’t check the box on a big goal you may still be able to point to a few steps in the right direction.

I further thought that this type of thinking is exactly the kind of advice anyone can use when pursuing just about anything including trying to kickstart a start-up company, design a self-driving car or write that great American novel. If at first you don’t succeed – try, try again. Failure and false-starts go hand in hand with perfect passes, winning touchdowns and eventual Super Bowl victories.

And with that – I re-committed.  touchdown

I’m Back to the Future and I’m headed back to the golf course! 

Svgolfer – signing out.

Back to The Future 2017 – Part I

Back to the Future and Why a Short Memory Is a Good Thing for Golfers & Start-Up Innovators

Many times I hear a sports commentator reflect on the mental game of a good quarterback, basketball player or golfer and they’ll say something like, “He has a short memory and that’s something that serves him well.” They’ll continue and say something like “You know he’s gonna fire that touchdown in there if he’s given a chance. He’s always thinking about the next down, the next play…. and doesn’t let bad passes, turnovers or interceptions throw him – You just can’t teach that stuff!!” football-pass

Confidence and the ability to ‘get ‘er done,’ comes from constantly looking forward and letting the history a mistake or a bad decision or a lapse in performance be exactly that – history. 20/20 hindsight often offers little except stoked fires of regret, resentment and self-degradation.

I think this viewpoint also applies to my journey of  trying to get to a point of comfort playing golf. A journey that’s always exacerbated by the time commitments of working overtime in the grueling new technology economy that’s fast-paced and where often the phrase ‘everything is new and has never been done before,’ stands as the crucible of what it means to be a worker in Silicon Valley. And that applies to start-up founders as well as your run of the mill everyday employee. I’ve had the luxury of being both.

EW20th_infographic_FINALThis experiment called Silicon Valley is quite amazing if you stop and think about it. Even though there are many huge billion dollar companies in the Bay Area – many of them are no more than twenty years old and that includes household names like Google, Apply and Amazon. Old-timers like Intel and Oracle are only twice as old thereabouts. Nothing here resembles the lifestyle, workstyle or pace of change found in more traditional last- century economies.  And even behemoths like Intel are still relative newborns compared to most old-economy companies. The parlance around here often refers to ‘lava formation’ as the state-of-creation that makes up everyday life and the challenges inherit in learning how to build stuff that’s never been created before – to do something new, to learn new techniques, to improve on what’s been built and to look for that proverbial touchdown after making a series of mistakes – and failure and mistakes run a plenty in this former land of “Heavenly Delight.’ We just don’t ever hear about them.

Which brings me back to my golf game. And a recent bout of retrospection I ended up grappling with over the holidays. I’ve spent some time musing over all the things I had planned to do in 2016. This was triggered by an innocent question from my daughter while on vacation. “Dad?” She asked “did you play that tournament last year like you said you would Dad?” She added “You know, you’ll never get better if you don’t practice.”

I was going to do so many things last year. I was going to be so discplined and get to the golf course and practice aspects of my swing and stance and grip while at home. I was going to get home training equipment. I was going to practice with a net in the front yard. I would get an instructor. I would play at least once a month and my crowning achievement would be playing in a tournament – any tournament! I hardly accomplished anyone of these goals – in fact, I hardly accomplished anything the more I looked backwards. My mental judger started issuing proclamations. What a loser I am. I’m never going to get anywhere. I’ve wasted so much time. Why should I bother? Making resolutions is a pointless thing to do.

Thinking about making commitments for this year became harder and harder. And then something changed. I decided to focus on the present and realized how what I decided to focus on NOW could make all the difference in how I would feel one year from now and beyond. There’s nothing I can do about yesterday but I still can impact tomorrow by doing something now. One day maybe I will be a 65 year old Unicorn tearing it up in some senior tournament – who knows? But I won’t get anywhere worrying and feeling down about the past. My biggest challenge wasn’t to figure out where I went wrong but to make a decision to re-commit today. And I thought about the sports commentators. The difference between success and failure starts in the mind. Deciding to try again isn’t really that hard a decision to make. And after much trepidation, I did.

….continued in Part II

Golf & Music & Tiger & Rory & Chambers Bay

Get it Chambers Bay – as in chamber music?

Golf and music (and cool technology innovations ) are my greatest passions hands down. If golf is truly a journey in self-competition, believing, finding, trusting and all those other internal psyche struggles then music is the soothing balm that can help capture mood feelings memory and verve in a way very few other arts can when you’re trying to be physically active and calm under pressure. Music can help climb that Mt. Psyche.

Speaking of which, here’s a pic of Tiger getting ready to practice one more time at Chambers Bay with a pair of cool wireless headphones. I can’t tell which mfg made them but their the ones that hang around your neck. Personally I like the ones from Motorola which stay on your head except the ear buds don’t stay fixed if you move around too much but they’re great for walking. Rory’s been seen in ads with a pair of Bose headphones so clearly music helps the best of the best play their best but I can’t understand why they didn’t advertise their wireless ones with him.

Needless to say, I guess I’m not the only one who gets his mojo going with a cool groovy playlist. It’s been a while so i’ll post a US Open inspirational song list in my next entry. But here’s a pic of Tiger getting ready to give it a go. SVG-out.

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Golf lesson 2b

Also, note to self – keep tension out of shoulders, and finish with elbows pointing down which is much easier if you don’t tense up in shoulder area. I got at standing workstation at work also to help counteract poor posture and muscle tension from sitting at a desk all day.

Some 18 months or more into my serious journey and I really feel like I’ve turned a corner.

Thx guys for encouraging me along and chiming in with your learnings as well

Golf Lesson #2

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Wow. This guy at Los Lagos GC sure is kinda different. Just finished my 2nd lesson. Will write more later but a few quick notes. Marry my right hand to the club n make sure all my fingers are on. Continue focus on holding finish. Think with your heart not your brain. The heart has more neurons than ur brain. It is a better intelligence and starting point for action. Be positive. Let go tension by breathing and thinking with a positive heart. I swung thru every ball with a trajectory that was fairly on target. No slices no chunks but more importantly much less fear and anxiety. I am grateful for my lessons. What a great Saturday. I just might sign up to play 9 or 18 holes by Tax day. And I feel like I am on track to start doing local tournaments by 2016. Who knew the heart was a better place to start any action! Yet it makes perfect sense. When the heart instructs the brain it feels so much more fluid. More later. Peace out.

P.S. the instructor’s name is Mike Flenniken. Every time I leave him I feel like Grasshopper in the old Kung Fu TV show. He really makes me think in a fresh non stressful non body mechanics way. Shazzamo ! Up up and away.

Golf is about human fulfillment – 1st Day

My first day of golf instruction for 2015. It was all about balance and getting my right knee to behave on time and finishing and holding my pose facing the target. And I guess I’m really tense in my shoulders. I actually ended with a beauty for 110 yard with my nine iron after multiple humbling skulls. Cest la vie. I’m on my way. And I like this coach. Smart and funny guy. And he speaks to my thinking as well as the sport. I’m off to get some club head tape and another paper journal.

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